ACAS Review (Bulletin)



Ebola crisis

By | October 2014

ACAS shares some diverse comments on the Ebola crisis: http://www.irinnews.org/report/100682/ebola-and-sierra-leone-money-is-the-easy-bit http://www.irinnews.org/report/100674/ebola-and-the-media-nigeria-s-good-news-story http://www.who.int/en  ; http://fol.org  ; http://www.blackstarnews.com/global-politics/africa/in-fighting-ebola-in-west-africa-viva-cuba.html … ; http://ruafrica.rutgers.edu/resources/ebola.html … ; http://www.africanstudies.org/blog/121-august-2015/393-letter-to-the-new-york-times-the-ebola-epidemic …  

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South Sudan Conflict

By | January 2014

Current events in South Sudan are most complex and harrowing, with peace much needed. The articles below, two by ACAS members, provide a range of useful information and viewpoints to help understand and guide action: The Political Struggle in South Sudan: Peace, Democracy and Reconstruction instead of war HORACE G. CAMPBELL CounterPunch,  JANUARY 10-12, 2014 http://www.counterpunch.org/2014/01/10/the-political-struggle-in-south-sudan/ […]

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Central African Republic: updates

By | December 2013

Four updates shared by Sarah Milburn for ACAS, three from Amnesty International team in Bangui http://www.amnesty.org/en/for-media/press-releases/african-union-concrete-action-urgently-needed-halt-atrocities-central-afric http://m.huffpost.com/us/entry/4432727 http://www.itv.com/news/2013-12-11/central-african-republic-enduring-unspeakable-acts-of-inhumanity/ and the fourth by Louisa Lombard: http://africasacountry.com/is-the-central-african-republic-on-the-verge-of-genocide/

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ACAS meetings during ASA in Baltimore

By | November 2013

The ACAS annual business meeting will be at 6:30 on Thursday, Nov. 21 at the Marriott Waterfront Hotel in Baltimore. Check African Studies Association program for room information. The ACAS-sponsored panel is “Foreign Capital Flows into African Agriculture: Implications and Alternatives,” chaired by Jeanne Koopman. Friday, Nov. 22 from 2:45 pm-4:30 pm. A second ACAS-related […]

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Agra Watch protests at Gates Foundation

By | March 2012

Agra Watch is in the news, with Associated Press covering its public protest at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation calling on the Foundation to sever its ties with Monsanto. Agra Watch was formed in 2008 to monitor and question the Gates Foundation’s participation in the Alliance for a Green Revolution in Africa (AGRA).

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The origins of AFRICOM: the Obama administration, the Sahara-Sahel and US Militarization of Africa (Part Three)

By | June 2010

It is all very well to use the pretext of the global War on Terror to secure Africa, but with the exceptions of the bombings of the two US Embassies in East Africa in 1998 that Daniel mentioned, there has been very little terrorism in Africa as a whole — certainly not in the regions where the oil is! However on the other side of the continent, what I might call the ‘oil side’, we get, beginning in 2002 and 2003, the fabrication of terrorism, centred on Algeria but then spreading across the Sahel and eventually linking in 2005 with Nigeria. The way in which this terrorism was fabricated is a very long narrative, which I don’t have time to go into here except to say that I have written two volumes on it. The first volume, The Dark Sahara: America’s war on terror in Africa, is here and you can buy it tonight. That whole long narrative was conducted by the Algerian secret military intelligence services — the DRS. It was conducted and orchestrated by the DRS, but with the knowledge and collusion of the US. In essence, they took 32 Europeans hostage and claimed it to be the work of Islamic extremists. They took the hostages through southern Algeria and then into Mali, the Sahel.

Filed under: ACAS Review (Bulletin), Bulletin 85
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The origins of AFRICOM: the Obama administration, the Sahara-Sahel and US Militarization of Africa (Part Two)

By | June 2010

What is responsible for the growing US military involvement began in the late 1990s? There are two major perceptions of US foreign policy makers. One was that the US was becoming increasingly dependent on resources, particularly oil, coming from the African continent. For example, today the US imports more oil from Africa than it does from the entire Middle East. The US still imports more from the Western hemisphere — Mexico, Canada, Columbia, Venezuela and Ecuador — which has a lot to do with explaining US policy these days towards Latin America and disputes with the Chavez regime. But, after that Africa is the next most important source of imported oil. Nigeria and Angola are now the US’s 5th and 6th largest suppliers of US oil imports. American policy makers began to see this happening in the late 1990s.

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The origins of AFRICOM: the Obama administration, the Sahara-Sahel and US Militarization of Africa (Part One)

By | June 2010

AFRICOM brings together three separate US military commands. Militarization of Africa is being co-ordinated by AFRICOM. It was established by President George Bush, following the war on terror and to serve other US interests. AFRICOM will also reflect on new doctrines of counterinsurgency and that means militarization as well as taking on developmental functions too. Is AFRICOM here to stay? I’m afraid it is just like EUCOM: here to stay. Will it do any good? I will leave that to our speakers. Will the Africans have their say? I hope so. The debate will be led by two speakers. The first is Daniel Volman and then Jeremy Keenan.

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All quiet on the West Africa front: terrorism, tourism and poverty in Mauritania

By | June 2010

In a recent article, Washington columnist David Ignatius (2009) smugly concludes that ‘we have an enemy that makes even more mistakes than we do’, and because of that, al-Qaida’s extremist ideology has been and will continue to be a failure. I wonder if the three Spaniards, two Italians and one Frenchman currently held hostage by those claiming to belong to al-Qaida au Maghreb Islamique (AQMI) in the Malian Sahara would agree.

Filed under: ACAS Review (Bulletin), Bulletin 79
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Sahelian blowback: what’s happening in Mali?

By | June 2010

Washington’s counterterrorism spectacles see only al-Qaeda. The debt burden and the impossibility of governance are not on the agenda. Whether the State Department or the Defense Department give arms to the Malian military says more about the anxiety in the U.S. than about the dynamic in Mali. Once more the U.S. will strengthen the military against civil society, and once more we might see Mali fall the way of Guinea and others in the region that were set up to become dictatorships. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton quite rightly called the mass rapes by the Guinean military ‘criminality of the greatest degree.’ If better sense does not prevail, not long from now we might read of similar atrocities at the Modibo Kéita Sports Stadium in Bamako.

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